Ron Kessler’s freechoice.jp is tied to website telling foreigners tricks to get out of Japan’s NHI

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The same server that hosts www.freechoice.jp also hosts www.nationalhealthinsurance.jp, a site educating expats about techniques (lies) to get out of Japan’s kokumin kenko hoken once enrolled . . .

Let’s look at this a bit more. The site cqdx.com, which is a server based in the United States, actually houses the e-mail functions of a number of businesses and activities, including:

Legend Travel
Legend Travelers
Nationalhealthinsurance.jp (the site I just mentioned)
Kigcafe (a Nichiren Buddhist site)
HealthOne (the company that threatened Shawn at LetsJapan.org with a “copyright” matter)
MedOne (an insurance-over-the-internet company related to Health One)
7j3aab.com (Kessler’s ham radio identification and site of Kessler Kabushikikaisha)
Gummymonster (Don’t ask me.)
X-pat.net (website for another “private” insurer brand owned by Legend Travelers
Travelerstrust, which I think is their travel insurance company based in America. Probably a subsidiary of Legend Travelers. I’m not sure whether the Travelers Insurance (the one with the umbrella symbol) has sent them any letters pointing out possible confusion and a trademark issue!

Presumably Ron Kessler has a relation to all of these

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10 comments

  1. Pingback: Is someone trying to cover Free Choice Foundation’s tracks? « Hoofin to You!
  2. Eido Inoue · December 14, 2009

    The tricks mentioned on that website involve some serious intentional fraud. To change your ward/city you’d have to falsify the paperwork stating where your residence is.

    That’s some pretty dodgy advice, and could get a non-Japanese in serious trouble with the Japanese law if the paperwork was checked.

    I love the “disclaimer” on the site, which tries to weasel out of any responsibility should someone get burned following the advice they give.

    • hoofin · December 14, 2009

      That’s the wildest part. And today, someone out there is trying like hell to cut the connection between the “cqdx.com” served websites and that National Health Watch. But the connection had been put there ages ago, so the Robtex site is only reporting what had been created earlier!

      I am by no means the internet expert, but I believe all these connections are “records” that “point” to other parts of the internet. So game over, really. Thanks to Robtex, everyone knows to look at Free Choice = HealthOne = Kessler = National Health Insurance Watch.

      The irony is that I never would have done any of this if someone hadn’t bullied Shawn over at Let’s Japan dot org.

      It just seemed so strange why positive news for one of these questionable “private insurers” would be something somebody would want to hide. And then I wondered why this “dmca.com” was employed as the bully to deliver the threat.

      Now it’s clear, I think. The letter connected HealthOne to Ronald Kessler and Free Choice. If you are trying to hold on to your customers in the face of what amounts to negative publicity about your business model, then, yes, you want to share the alleged good news with them–but no one outside that relationship! The con artist only wants to deal with the sucker or the “mark”, not the whole of society. “Con” is short for confidence, after all.

      So a reader of Shawn’s gets the letter and shares it with Shawn. Now Kessler and/or HealthOne is a little nervous, because here is a connection between the “private” and Kessler and his public activity.

      As he is an IT consultant to the health care industry–this is what Kessler billed himself as in the Japan Times–it’s hard for me to see how he thought that he wouldn’t inevitably be connected to one of the “privates”. Many commenters around our corner of cyberspace had already suspected this.

      For an internet con, it’s pretty amateurish, actually.

      And I certainly wouldn’t be putting out a website telling people ideas on how to commit fraud against government workers. And then think some “disclaimer” washes away the bad deed. That’s really disturbing.

  3. Ben · December 14, 2009

    Yep, this is some shady sh!t. Going to pass this info to my local contacts at Shibuya Ward office for investigation.

    • hoofin · December 15, 2009

      I’m astounded at the number of hits this topic always gets. Moreover, how the news travels!

  4. LB · December 15, 2009

    A whois search reveals that Ron Kessler is the individual who registered and owns the domains for kigcafe and healthone, so there’s your hard connection between Kessler and HealthOne. Granted, one person can register a domain and turn it over to someone else for the day-to-day running.

    It may be worth noting that aside from a server, HealthOne, MedOne, Legend Travelers all share the same telephone number. And Legend Travel, Legend Travelers, MedOne and HealthOne all share the same fax number.

    Just one big, happy family!

    • hoofin · December 15, 2009

      Thanks for your post, LB. I know a few people have gone to places like Domain Tools, where you can buy the archives of the registries, and also found connections as you did.

  5. Pingback: Japan health insurance: internet stirring up « Hoofin to You!
  6. kareljones · February 10, 2010

    While its true that the grass is always greener on the other side, many individuals have encountered problems abroad, then regretting not having ample support from their place of origin.
    One of the things one need to check out very carefully is the expat health insurance.
    Examine the provision of healthcare.

  7. Pingback: Activism without the bile | Tepido.org - Not the Hokkaido Crusader

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