Is someone trying to cover Free Choice Foundation’s tracks?

I am still on this thing from yesterday.

Using the Robtex website, at, of course www.robtex.com, I noticed that someone has decided (within the last day?) to put up an “mx record” or mail exchange record, pointing the e-mail destination for National Health Insurance Watch to a GoDaddy hosted server.

CLICK TO ENLARGE THIS.

As we saw yesterday, there is a “ptr record” or pointer record for National Health Insurance Watch at the same IP address (209.200.87.151) as all the other websites that seem to have a connection, one way or another, to Ron Kessler of the Free Choice Foundation.

So, to recap:

1) “cqdx.com” hosts the HealthOne website. HealthOne.jp was registered by Ronald Kessler and the location given was Miki in Japan. Even though “cqdx.com” itself is in the United States.

2) a Robtex search shows that a number of “ptr” pointer record e-mail functions are linked to 209.200.87.151, which in turn is hosted by the same “cqdx.com”. There are a finite number of sites connected to “cqdx.com” and 209.200.87.151. I listed these yesterday, and they include Free Choice Foundation, HealthOne, National Health Insurance Watch, and Kessler K.K.

3) Someone had previously set up a National Health Insurance Watch website on a GoDaddy host. But they never updated the function where “mail.nationalhealthwatch.jp” only pointed to 209.200.87.151 until (it appears) yesterday. Now, it appears that site has two connections.

Why do all these sites have the common connection, though?

4 thoughts on “Is someone trying to cover Free Choice Foundation’s tracks?

  1. hxxp:\\www.nationalhealthinsurance.jp\ doesn’t point to much of anything now and hxxp:\\68.178.191.76\ point to an India based company specialising in web site setup etc.

    (URLs purposely obfuscated. Not really sure why I did that.)

    1. Someone pointed that out to me, also. It’s an odd record where the mail exchange (“MX”) points to the same place as the all the other cqdx.com businesses. But then, it also points to someplace allegedly in India, through GoDaddy. (It could be a U.S. site that is handled by administrators in India.)

      The other avenue is to go to Domain Tools and buy the archive. There has been at least 11 or 12 changes to nationalhealthinsurance.jp since inception.

  2. Not that I wish to defend anything that HealthOne.jp is doing but looking over the website (out of morbid curiosity) it seems to be set up like Tomin Kyousai, the plan that just about anyone can join in Japan to cover additional hospital expenses. It doesn’t have the JPY 10 000 deductible but coverage seems to be similar based on a cursory glance over it (not really enough time to study either one in depth.)

    HealthOne.jp also has the following disclaimer in their plan guide:

    “[…] HealthOne shall not pay any claim for care, treatment,
    services or supplies furnished by any program or agency funded by any government, such as but not limited to Welfare, National Health Insurance, Social Health Insurance, Workman’s Compensation, as well as privately funded workman’s compensation, medical insurance, accident insurance, auto insurance, liability insurance, third-party liability toward the Insured, or others. HealthOne will pay only any eligible excess beyond the amount payable under such other plan, insurance or third-party liability towards the Insured. When applying for coverage under HealthOne, the potential Insured must notify HealthOne of the existence of any public or private insurance under which s/he is enrolled. […]”

    That seems to make it look like it is supplemental insurance rather than replacement insurance.

    1. Chuckers, thanks for the legwork. I think you are right about “tomin kyoukai”—what I have been calling gap insurance. Gap insurance is A O.K. here. And some people would rather just prepay, rather than face any medical bill. They want that peace of mind.

      The problem, of course, is that gap insurance is not real insurance. It’s just insurance to cover the 30% that the real insurance doesn’t pay. (Up to that point where the real insurance pays 100%—we call that “major medical” in America.)

      The second part, the HealthOne disclaimer, I agree makes it look like supplemental. But what I think they are getting at with the language is this:

      1) If you buy our product and you already have other real insurance, then we’ll just pay the difference.

      2) You have to tell us that that’s so (if you are carrying other insurance.) Otherwise, you breach and we don’t pay at all. Or maybe just the part the real insurance didn’t pay. (This is HealthOne’s protection from the con artist who submits one bill to BOTH HealthOne AND the government. Cons don’t like to be conned.)

      3) If you aren’t carrying other insurance, then we’ll pay up to the limits and terms of the policy.

      So it is replacement insurance if you, ehem, choose not to be in the government-mandated programs. Nudge, nudge. Otherwise, it’s supplemental insurance.

      That’s the game. Viva!Vida! is doing the same thing.

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