Japan abduction dialogue continues on in comments to last Friday’s post.

You can see the post and comments here.

For the amount of time that I dedicate to blogging, I can’t keep up with the various posts. There are a couple of good commenters who are moving the dialogue away from the acrimony that I mentioned about yesterday.

I have also managed to visit two good websites on the Japan child abduction and joint custody issues, here, here, and here. The third one is very much in the “Occupy” style of showing a picture, but no statement on a cardboard sign or letter.

I have Tony DelVecchio’s down as a permanent link on the lower right of this site.

I am interested in this on strand of debate, on whether the State Department has been doing all it can, or kicking the can. You know, normally I focus on Japan employment discrimination and the problem with pension (social security) coverage—where I feel the State Department doesn’t really give a rat’s ass. So I wonder about the child abduction issue, too. I strongly suspect that they only move as fast as the U.S. Department of Defense and the major multinational corporations with interests in Japan let them.

[Update 12/31/11: Another good site about Left Behind issues.]

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2 comments

  1. Tony Del Vecchio · December 30, 2011

    “I strongly suspect that they only move as fast as the U.S. Department of Defense and the major multinational corporations with interests in Japan let them.”

    I mean, where do you come up with this nonsense, Hoofin? I hate to have to say this to you, but you really don’t know what you’re talking about. The State Department folks have been dropping the diplomatic equivalent of bunker buster bombs on their counterparts to try to compel Japan to move forward on this issue. I can’t keep repeating the long list of things they have done for us, so please go to my blog and do some research yourself.

    I think you said before that you had some experience living in Japan and learning about this culture. Then you must be aware that Japan regularly screws it’s own citizens up the wazoo. Yet you believe that somehow they are going to accommodate a group of foreigners in short order because, well, “we’re Americans after all!” IT DOESN’T WORK LIKE THAT IN REAL LIFE. Korean sex slaves and the hibakusha are still petitioning their government for redress some sixty-six years down the line. The Minamata mercury poisoning case took decades to resolve, after most of the victims had already died.

    You say you are “interested in this strand of debate” yet it appears to me you’ve already made your mind up. I am committed to working with my government to effect the change we all desire, but am adult enough to understand that changing the course of Japan’s trajectory on this issue is going to take time and patience. If certain parent groups can’t grow up and come to terms with this unassailable fact it would be better for all involved if they would just crawl inside a bottle for the next several years and leave the real work to people who can.

    • hoofin · December 30, 2011

      I said:

      “I strongly suspect that they only move as fast as the U.S. Department of Defense and the major multinational corporations with interests in Japan let them.”

      Tony responded:

      I mean, where do you come up with this nonsense, Hoofin? I hate to have to say this to you, but you really don’t know what you’re talking about. The State Department folks have been dropping the diplomatic equivalent of bunker buster bombs on their counterparts to try to compel Japan to move forward on this issue. I can’t keep repeating the long list of things they have done for us, so please go to my blog and do some research yourself.

      I’m not so sure it’s nonsense. All I am saying is that I think the Department of State pushes only so far as the Department of Defense says is appropriate. And the Department of Defense’s “national security” is defined primarily by the big multinational corporations for whom that coursing, trans-Pacific trade is their big honey pot. I think the Defense Department is worried about their project going on in Okinawa. I wonder a bit, too, about how China, our major creditor, feels about us having our guns pointed at them. You say that the government has done a lot for the Left Behind Parents, relative to other people and other issues. That may be true. But there has to be more to the dynamic than just what you say, because there are all those other moving parts. IMHO, you know.

      Tony said:

      I think you said before that you had some experience living in Japan and learning about this culture. Then you must be aware that Japan regularly screws it’s own citizens up the wazoo. Yet you believe that somehow they are going to accommodate a group of foreigners in short order because, well, “we’re Americans after all!” IT DOESN’T WORK LIKE THAT IN REAL LIFE. Korean sex slaves and the hibakusha are still petitioning their government for redress some sixty-six years down the line. The Minamata mercury poisoning case took decades to resolve, after most of the victims had already died.

      Oh, I am very well aware that the runners of Japan (notice I use this as much as “government of Japan”) really screw their own citizens. This is nothing new–it’s been going on since 1500 A.D., at least. For as much as the Japanese top people talk about “unity”, sacrifice is usually someone else’s business, and life at times can be pretty cheap. Witness this year’s nuclear fiasco.

      I believe they should accommodate a group of foreigners in short order, because it’s a small group of people and it’s an international matter. Tony, you paint the Left Behinders (the parents of the 170) as a small group. I say, if it’s small, it should not be a “big” issue for the Japanese government to come to an accommodation. Why are they making it such a big issue? If it’s just a handful of families, why can’t the government just deliver over the kidnapped American children?

      I realize that BACHome is a radicalized group, compared to Global Future. People who try to tell me that I am doing something illegal if I let someone else have their say is really putting me on to the scent, you know? I’m not as stupid as I let on, you know? Something that should be considered are “externalities”. BACHome may be doing some screwball things, but it may be that 75% is counterproductive, and 25% is putting the issues out there so that the government people on our side feel that they’ve got to keep this going. I really don’t know. Your opinion is that the BACHomers suck, basically. Mine is that they’re radicals.

      Tony said:

      You say you are “interested in this strand of debate” yet it appears to me you’ve already made your mind up.

      No, I have not made my mind up. The more information I get, I modify what I think. It’s like Lord Keynes was reputed to have said:

      “When my information changes, I alter my conclusions. What do you do, sir?”

      . . . although Keynes probably didn’t say this.

      Tony concludes:

      I am committed to working with my government to effect the change we all desire, but am adult enough to understand that changing the course of Japan’s trajectory on this issue is going to take time and patience. If certain parent groups can’t grow up and come to terms with this unassailable fact it would be better for all involved if they would just crawl inside a bottle for the next several years and leave the real work to people who can.

      Tony, it’s the best course of action. You can only cooperate with the government, and here it would be State Department and any Japanese unit that seems to be in favor of doing the right thing. I have waited on my employment situation since November 2008, so I know that anything involving government requires a great patience—enough to make you wonder whether anyone is really doing anything. And it is “take a number”, too, isn’t it?

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