I completed my Affordable Care Act application via healthcare.gov this weekend.

Anyone else?

This was Saturday morning via a school internet connection–it’s the only place I’ve been able to get into healthcare.gov from. I have been unable to logon successfully from home or other location.

The final parts were to pick a plan, and find out the net cost. I didn’t get any confirmation that this is all going to happen, but I’m confident the computer has what it needs, because the calculation for my share was right on the money.

Highmark out of Pittsburgh dominates the offerings for Lancaster County. The only other one I saw that stood out was Geisinger. I had already planned to go with Highmark, since I knew about the plan offerings from its own website.

[Update 10/16/13: Apparently, the last step “unfinished” itself sometime after I signed off. When I got on today from home—which I discovered I can do IF I use Safari, it’s got me as not having finalized. But I know this is the plan I want.]

[Update 11/8/13: To folks asking, based on this entry, the application has been completed. It was the Dental Glitch.]

[Update 11/20/13: First bill from Highmark already received and paid. Seen any articles in the news like that yet?]

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6 comments

  1. Ken McCune · October 14, 2013

    I live in NY and recently completed application for exchange. Family of 2 adults and 2 children age 21 and 22. Bronze coverage comes out to about $8500 per year with no tax credit as income is >400% FPL. (Adult children income must be included as I claim them and they make more than $10,000 each ). My question is why is the national average according to the KFF calculator almost twice what the NY State calculator is? I am not complaining but I sure would be if I had to pay the average. Any ideas why this is so?? Thanks

  2. Diane Jefferis · October 14, 2013

    Can you clear something up for me as I’m confused on this particular issue? My friend works for a union grocery store. There are 33 full time employees and 82 part timers. The part timers work an avg. of 15-20 hrs. per wk. Recently the part timers were told after contract negotiations that they would lose their health insurance on Jan 1 but can go on the exchanges. The co however will continue to cover their vision and dental on Jan. 1. Now from everything I’ve seen part timer hours will count toward FTE (full time employee hrs when aggregated and divided by 120) From my calculations this company has over 2000 hrs. per mo. Is this a case where the company will be paying a $3000 penalty per employee because some of the employees will be going on the exchanges? Or is there a waiver for the unions regarding this matter?

    • hoofin · October 15, 2013

      The penalty is $2,000 per full-time employee, with the first 30 exempt, or $3,000 per full-time employee who receives a credit on the exchange. This is only for companies that employ 50 or more “full time equivalent” workers. Only four percent of American companies are that large, and 96% of those already offer insurance. So 4% of the 4% (100%-96%) are even in the range of the employer mandate penalty.

      It sounds like someone in that company did the math, and discovered that the part-timers are way better off buying policies in the Marketplace (the Exchange) and getting the federal credit. In some low wage industries, pay packets are so thin that Enhanced Silver is available to the wage earner, where the policy is picking up either 73% or 94% of the actuarial costs. Why have a company “Bronze” coverage, when you can get a Silver policy with better coverage for less out of pocket?

      In some cases, it makes sense for the employer to pay the penalty and direct the employee to the Marketplace/Exchange. In other cases, the employees are going to find out that they would rather have a Marketplace policy. Still too little is known about a law that’s been on the books for 3 1/2 years. The more people are finding out about prices and coverages, the more they like it. (That’s why the site crashed, in part.)

  3. annetteganderson · October 17, 2013

    My local Blue Cross rep sent me a paper copy of the app (form # 0938-1191) so that I could apply despite not being able to get online. But I can’t begin to figure out what detail to try to go in to on pg 3 (Current Job & Income Info). Spouse has/is a Subchapter S Corp & we file jointly. Negative AGI for 2012 and projected ’13, ’14 and ’15 because of a 2008 loss carrying forward. We have the add-back of some SS income each month, so I know that HAS to go on, but I don’t know how to convey the components of our neg. AGI in the small spaces provided. Help :/

    • hoofin · October 18, 2013

      Annette,

      I am not sure what to tell you, since you are using a form I am not familiar with. If it’s paper, then you simply put a negative in front of the number. I also can’t say, from what you’ve said, whether it means you would get Medicaid or not. Anyone can buy on the Marketplace (Exchange). Usually, it’s a question of whether the credit is available on the purchase.

  4. annetteganderson · October 18, 2013

    Thanks! That form is a print out of the online app. I did the online app & really blew it (sigh). Results said to put our 3 kids on Medicaid & to deal w adults being in the coverage gap. We have spendable income inside our neg. AGI & $43K/yr in SS outside our AGI, but $20K of that SS comes directly to our kids. My blind spot was thinking the kids’ $20K/yr SS would be included in our MAGI. I have a call in to the ‘Advanced Resolution Center’ to request a review/possible correction of my app. The scope of our situation just wasn’t covered in the ?’s asked. We’ll see!

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